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Molecular testing and patterns of treatment in patients with NSCLC: An IASLC analysis of ASCO CancerLinQ Discovery Data.

Abstract

9128
Background: Precision medicine has resulted in improved outcomes for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); while molecular testing is considered critical for guiding treatment decisions for advanced stage NSCLC, adoption of testing in routine practice is variable. We analyzed the factors contributing to molecular testing and treatment patterns in patients with lung cancer. Methods: The ASCO CancerLinQ Discovery dataset was queried to identify patients diagnosed with lung cancer between the years 2010-2018. Data on demographics, tumor stage, histology and treatments were extracted, and receipt of molecular testing was investigated as the primary outcome. Univariate association of each clinicopathological variable with molecular testing outcome was performed using chi-square test for categorical variables and ANOVA test for numerical variables. A multivariable logistic regression analysis with backward selection at an alpha of 0.05 was reported. All analyses were conducted using SAS 9.4. Results: A total of 37,925 NSCLC patients with stage IV disease were analyzed. Patient characteristics: median age 65 years, 51% male, 68% white, 33.5% adenocarcinoma. Approximately 22% of all NSCLC patients had molecular testing results. In adenocarcinoma patients, 49% had molecular testing results available. In the stage IV group, 47% were treated with chemotherapy, 16% with immunotherapy and 3% with targeted therapy. On multivariable analysis, females were more likely to have molecular testing compared to males [(OR: 1.29 (1.22-1.37); p < 0.001]. Compared to White patients, Black patients were less likely to have molecular testing [OR: 0.89 (0.81-0.97); p = 0.009] and Asians were more likely to undergo testing [OR: 2.22 (1.79-2.75); p < 0.001]. Hispanic patients were more likely to undergo molecular testing compared to non-Hispanics [OR:1.24 (1.02-1.52); p = 0.03]. Additionally, treatment with immunotherapy [OR: 1.86 (1.72-2.01); p < 0.001] and targeted therapy [OR: 2.29 (2.00-2.64); p < 0.001] were associated with significantly higher likelihood of having molecular testing. These results were also confirmed on a subgroup analysis of adenocarcinoma patients. Conclusions: In this analysis of a US-based real-world dataset of stage IV NSCLC patients, White race and female sex are associated with higher likelihood of having molecular test performed. The percentage of patients undergoing testing remains sub-optimal.

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Journal of Clinical Oncology
Pages: 9128

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Published in print: June 01, 2022
Published online: June 02, 2022

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Madhusmita Behera
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
Gregory Joseph
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
Manali Rupji
Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
Zhonglu Huang
Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
Becky Bunn
Murry Wynes
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, Aurora, CO;
Jeffrey M. Switchenko
Emory University, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Atlanta, GA;
Giorgio V. Scagliotti
Department of Oncology, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Turin, Italy;
Kristin Ann Higgins
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
Ming Sound Tsao
Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada;
Chandra Prakash Belani
Penn State Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA;
Lecia V. Sequist
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA;
Suresh S. Ramalingam
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA;
Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Emory University, Atlanta, GA; IASLC, Aurora, CO; International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, Aurora, CO; Emory University, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Atlanta, GA; Department of Oncology, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Turin, Italy; Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Penn State Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

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IASLC.

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Madhusmita Behera, Gregory Joseph, Manali Rupji, Zhonglu Huang, Becky Bunn, Murry Wynes, Jeffrey M. Switchenko, Giorgio V. Scagliotti, Kristin Ann Higgins, Ming Sound Tsao, Chandra Prakash Belani, Lecia V. Sequist, Suresh S. Ramalingam
Journal of Clinical Oncology 2022 40:16_suppl, 9128-9128

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